Archives For Philosophy

The philosophical aspects of safety and risk.

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Just because you can, doesn’t mean you ought

An interesting article by  and  on the moral hazard that the use of drone strikes poses and how in the debate on their use there arises a confusion of the facts with value. To say that drone strikes are effective and near consequence free, at least for the perpetrator, does not equate to the conclusion that they are ethical and that we should carry them out. Nor does the capability to safely attack with focused lethality mean that we will in fact make better ethical decisions. The moral hazard that Kaag and Krep assert is that the technological ease of use can end up becoming the justification for it’s use. My prediction is that with the increasing automation, and increasing psychological distancing that comes with it, of what the military calls the kill chain this propensity will inevitably increase. Herman Kahn is probably smiling now, wherever he is.

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On Artificial Intelligence as Ethical Prosthesis

Out here in the grim meat-hook present of Reaper missions and Predator drone strikes we’re already well down track to a future in which decisions as to who lives and who dies are made less and less by human beings, and more and more by automation.

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Toyota ECM (Image source: Barr testimony presentation)

Comparing and contrasting

In 2010 NASA was called in by the National Highway Transport Safety Administration to help in figuring out the reason for reported unintended Toyota Camry accelerations. They subsequently published a report including a dedicated software annex. What’s interesting to me is the different outcome and conclusions of the two reports regarding software.  Continue Reading…

Waaay back in 2002 Chris Holloway wrote a paper that used a fictional civil court case involving the hazardous failure of software to show that much of the expertise and received wisdom of software engineering was, using the standards of the US federal judiciary, junky and at best opinion based.

Rereading the transcripts of Phillip Koopman, and Michael Barr in the 2013 Toyota spaghetti monster case I am struck both by how little things have changed and how far actual state of the industry can be from state of the practice, let alone state of the art. Life recapitulates art I guess, though not in a good way.

When Formal Systems Kill, an interesting paper by Lee Pike and Darren Abramson looking at the automatic formal system property of computers from an ethical perspective. Of course as we all know, the 9000 series has a perfect operational record…

Easter 2014 bus-cycle accident (Image Source: James Brickwood)

The limits of rational-legal authority

One of the underlying and unquestioned aspects of modern western society is that the power of the state is derived from a rational-legal authority, that is in the Weberian sense of a purposive or instrumental rationality in pursuing some end. But what if it isn’t? What if the decisions of the state are more based on belief in how people ought to behave and how things ought to be rather than reality? What, in other words, if the lunatics really are running the asylum?

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On being a professional

Currently dealing with some software types who, god bless their wooly socks, are less than enthusiastic about dealing with all this ‘paperwork’ and ‘process’, which got me to thinking about the nature of professionalism.

While the approach of ‘Bürokratie über alles’ doesn’t sit well with me I confess, on the other side of coin I see the girls just wanna have fun mentality of many software developers as symptomatic of a lack of professionalism amongst the programming class. Professionals in my book intuitively understand that the ‘job’ entails three parts the preparing, the doing and the cleaning up, in a stoichiometric ratio of 4:2:4. That’s right, any job worth doing is a basic mix of two parts fun to eight part diligence, and that’s true if you’re a carpenter or a heart surgeon.

Unfortunately the fields of computer science seems to attract what I can only call man children, those folk who like Peter Pan want to fly around never land and never grow up, which is OK if you’re coding Java beans for a funky hipster website, not so great if you’re writing an embedded program for a pacemaker, and so in response we have seem to have process*.

Now as a wise man once remarked, process really says you don’t trust your people so I draw the logical conclusion that the continuing process obsession of the software community simply reflects an endemic lack of trust, due to the aforementioned lack professionalism, in that field. In contrast I trust my heart surgeon (or my master carpenter) because she is an avowed, experienced and skillful professional not because she’s CMMI level 4 certified.

*I guess that’s also why we have the systems engineer. :)