Archives For Risk

What is risk, how dow we categorise it and deal with it.

MH370 underwater search area map (Image source- Australian Govt)

Bayes and the search for MH370

We are now approximately 60% of the way through searching the MH370 search area, and so far nothing. Which is unfortunate because as the search goes on the cost continues to go up for the taxpayer (and yes I am one of those). What’s more unfortunate, and not a little annoying, is that that through all this the ATSB continues to stonily ignore the use of a powerful search technique that’s been used to find everything from lost nuclear submarines to the wreckage of passenger aircraft.  Continue Reading…

Here’s an interesting graph that compares Class A mishap rates for USN manned aviation (pretty much from float plane to Super-Hornet) against the USAF’s drone programs. Interesting that both programs steadily track down decade by decade, even in the absence of formal system safety programs for most of the time (1).

USN Manned Aviation vs USAF Drones

The USAF drone program start out with around the 60 mishaps per 100,000 flight hour rate (equivalent to the USN transitioning to fast jets at the close of the 1940s) and maintains a steeper decrease rate that the USN aviation program. As a result while the USAF drones program is tail chasing the USN it still looks like it’ll hit parity with the USN sometime in the 2040s.

So why is the USAF drone program doing better in pulling down the accident rate, even when they don’t have a formal MIL-STD-882 safety program?

Well for one a higher degree of automation does have comparitive advantages. Although the USN’s carrier aircraft can do auto-land, they generally choose not to, as pilot’s need to keep their professional skills up, and human error during landing/takeoff inevitably drives the mishap rate up. Therefore a simple thing like implementing an auto-land function for drones (landing a drone is as it turns out not easy) has a comparatively greater bang for your safety buck. There’s also inherently higher risks of loss of control and mid air collision when air combat manoeuvring, or running into things when flying helicopters at low level which are operational hazards that drones generally don’t have to worry about.

For another, the development cycle for drones tends to be quicker than manned aviation, and drones have a ‘some what’ looser certification regime, so improvements from the next generation of drone design tend to roll into an expanding operational fleet more quickly. Having a higher cycle rate also helps retain and sustain the corporate memory of the design teams.

Finally there’s the lessons learned effect. With drones the hazards usually don’t need to be identified and then characterised. In contrast with the early days of jet age naval aviation the hazards drone face are usually well understood with well understood solutions, and whether these are addressed effectively has more to do with programmatic cost concerns than a lack of understanding. Conversely when it actually comes time to do something like put de-icing onto a drone, there’s a whole lot of experience that can be brought to bear with a very good chance of first time success.

A final question. Looking at the above do we think that the application of rigorous ‘FAA like’ processes or standards like ARP 4761, ARP 4754 and DO-178 would really improve matters?

Hmmm… maybe not a lot.

Notes

1. As a historical note while the F-14 program had the first USN aircraft system safety program (it was a small scale contractor in house effort) it was actually the F/A-18 which had the first customer mandated and funded system safety program per MIL-STD-882. USAF drone programs have not had formal system safety programs, as far as I’m aware.
Continue Reading…

For those of you interested in such things, there’s an interesting thread running over on the Safety Critical Mail List at Bielefeld on software failure. Sparked off by Peter Ladkin’s post over on Abnormal Distribution on the same subject. Whether software can be said to fail and whether you can use the term reliability to describe it is one of those strange attractors about which the list tends to orbit. An interesting discussion, although at times I did think we were playing a variant of Wittgenstein’s definition game.

And my opinion? Glad you asked.

Yes of course software fails. That it’s failure is not the same as the pseudo-random failure that we posit to hardware components is neither here nor there. Continue Reading…

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Why we should take the safety performance of small samples with a grain of salt

Safety when expressed quantitatively as the probability of a loss over some unit of exposure, is in effect a proportional rate. This is useful as we can compare the performance of different systems or operations when one has of operating hours, and potentially lots of accidents while another has only a few operating hours and therefore fewer accidents. Continue Reading…

Work-Health-and-Safety

I’ll give you a hint it’s not pretty

Current Australian rail and workplace safety legislation requires that safety risks be either eliminated, or if that’s not possible be reduced, ‘so far as is reasonably practical’. The intent is to ensure that all reasonable practicable precautions are in place, not to achieve some target level of risk.

There are two elements to what is ‘reasonably practicable’. A duty-holder must first consider what can be done – that is, what is possible in the circumstances for ensuring health and safety. They must then consider whether it is reasonable, in the circumstances to do all that is possible. This means that what can be done should be done unless it is reasonable in the circumstances for the duty-holder to do something less.

Worksafe  Australia

This is a real and intractable problem for standards that determine the degree of effort applied to treat a hazard using an initial assessment of risk (1). Nor can the legislation be put aside through appeals to such formalisms as the ALARP principle, or the invocation of a standard such as AS 61508 (2). In essence if it is practical to do something, regardless of the degree of risk, then something should be done.  Continue Reading…

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An interesting article from The Conversation on the semiotics of the Doomsday clock. Continue Reading…

Screwtape(Image source: end time info)

A short (and possibly evil) treatise on SILs from our guest blogger

May I introduce myself? The name’s Screwtape, some of you might have heard of me from that short and nasty book by C.S. Lewis. All lies of course, and I would know, about lies that is… baboom tish! Anyway the world has moved on and I’m sure that you’d be completely unsurprised to hear that I’ve branched out into software consulting now. I do find the software industry one that is oh so over-ripe for the plucking of immortal souls, ah but I digress. Your good host has asked me here today to render a few words on the question of risk based safety integrity levels and how to turn such pesky ideals, akin in many ways to those other notions of christian virtue, to your own ends. Continue Reading…