Archives For Safety

The practice of safety engineering in various high consequence industries.

SR-71 flight instruments (Image source: triddle)

How a invention that flew on the SR-71 could help commercial aviation today 

In a previous post on unusual attitude I talked about the use of pitch ladders as a means of providing greater attensity to aircraft attitude as well as a better indication of what the aircraft is dong, having entered into it. There are of course still disadvantages with this because such data in a commercial aircraft is usually presented ‘eyes down’, and in high stress, high workload situations it can be difficult to maintain concentration on instruments and an instrument scan pattern. There is however an alternative, and one that has a number of advantages. Continue Reading…

Unreliable airspeed events pose a significant challenge (and safety risk) because such situations throw onto aircrew the most difficult (and error prone) of human cognitive tasks, that of ‘understanding’ a novel situation. This results in a double whammy for unreliable airspeed incidents. That is the likelihood of an error in ‘understanding’ is far greater than any other error type, and having made that sort of error it’s highly likely that it’s going to be a fatal one. Continue Reading…

A while ago, while I was working on a project that would have been based (in part) in Queensland I was asked to look at the implications of the Registered Professional Engineers Queensland act for the project, and in particular for software development. For those not familiar, the Act provides for the registration of professional engineers to practise in Queensland. If you’re not registered you can’t practice unless you’re supervised by a registered engineer. Upon registering you then become liable to a statutory Board of Professional Engineers for your professional conduct. Oh yes and practicing without coverage is a crime.

While the act is oriented squarely at the provision of professional services, don’t presume that it is solely the concern of consultancies.  Continue Reading…

AirAsia QZ8501 CVR (Image source - AP Photo-Achmad Ibrahim)

Stall warning and Alternate law

According to an investigator from Indonesia’s National Transportation Safety Committee (NTSC) several alarms, including the stall warning, could be heard going off on the Cockpit Voice Recorder’s tape.

Now why is that so significant?

Continue Reading…

Aviation is in itself not inherently dangerous. But to an even greater degree than the sea, it is terribly unforgiving of any carelessness, incapacity or neglect.

 

Captain A. G. Lamplugh, British Aviation Insurance Group, London, 1930s.

I was cleaning out my (metaphorical) sock drawer and came across this rough guide to the workings of the Australian Defence standard on software safety DEF(AUST) 5679. The guide was written around 2006 for Issue 1 of the standard, although many of the issues it discussed persisted into Issue 2, which hit the streets in 2008.

DEF (AUST) 5679 is an interesting standard, one can see that the authors, Tony Cant amongst them, put a lot of thought into the methodology behind the standard, unfortunately it’s suffered from a failure to achieve large scale adoption and usage.

So here’s my thoughts at the time on how to actually use the standard to best advantage, I also threw in some concepts on how to deal with xOTS components within the DEF (AUST) 5679 framework.

Enjoy :)