Archives For Safety

The practice of safety engineering in various high consequence industries.

Finding MH370

26/08/2014 — Leave a comment

MH370 underwater search area map (Image source- Australian Govt)

Finding MH370 is going to be a bitch

The aircraft has gone down in an area which is the undersea equivalent of the eastern slopes of the Rockies, well before anyone mapped them. Add to that a search area of thousands of square kilometres in about an isolated a spot as you can imagine, a search zone interpolated from satellite pings and you can see that it’s going to be tough.

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On Artificial Intelligence as Ethical Prosthesis

Out here in the grim meat-hook present of Reaper missions and Predator drone strikes we’re already well down track to a future in which decisions as to who lives and who dies are made less and less by human beings, and more and more by automation.

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Waaay back in 2002 Chris Holloway wrote a paper that used a fictional civil court case involving the hazardous failure of software to show that much of the expertise and received wisdom of software engineering was, using the standards of the US federal judiciary, junky and at best opinion based.

Rereading the transcripts of Phillip Koopman, and Michael Barr in the 2013 Toyota spaghetti monster case I am struck both by how little things have changed and how far actual state of the industry can be from state of the practice, let alone state of the art. Life recapitulates art I guess, though not in a good way.

Tweedle Dum and Dee (Image source: Wikipedia Commons)

Revisiting the Knight, Leveson experiments

In the through the looking glass world of high integrity systems, the use of N-version programming is often touted as a means to achieve extremely lower failure rates without extensive V&V, due to the postulated independence of failure in independently developed software. Unfortunately this is hockum, as Knight and Leveson amply demonstrated with their N version experiments, but there may actually be advantages to N versioning, although not quite what the proponents of it originally expected.

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Hazard checklists

06/07/2014 — 1 Comment

As I had to throw together an example checklist for a course I’m running, here it is. I’ve also given a little bit of a commentary on the use, advantages and disadvantages of checklists as well. Enjoy. :)

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The DEF STAN 00-55 monster is back!!

That’s right, moves are afoot to reboot the cancelled UK MOD standard for software safety, DEF STAN 00-55. See the UK SCSC’s Event Diary for an opportunity to meet and greet the writers. They’ll have the standard up for an initial look on-line sometime in July as we well, so stay posted.

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Cleveland street train overrun (Image source: ATSB)

The final ATSB report, sloppy and flawed

The ATSB has released it’s final report into the Cleveland street overrun and it’s disappointing, at least when it comes to how and why a buffer stop that actually materially contributed to an overrun came to be installed at Cleveland street station. I wasn’t greatly impressed by their preliminary report and asked some questions of the ATSB at the time (their response was polite but not terribly forthcoming) so I decided to see what the final report was like before sitting in judgement.

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