Archives For Safety

The practice of safety engineering in various high consequence industries.

The offending PCA serial cable linking the comms module to the motherboard (Image source: Billy Rios)

Hannibal ante portas!

A recent article in Wired discloses how hospital drug pumps can be hacked and the firmware controlling them modified at will. Although in theory the comms module and motherboard should be separated by an air gap, in practice there’s a serial link cunningly installed to allow firmware to be updated via the interwebz.

As the Romans found, once you’ve built a road that a legion can march down it’s entirely possible for Hannibal and his elephants to march right up it. Thus proving once again, if proof be needed, that there’s nothing really new under the sun. In a similar vein we probably won’t see any real reform in this area until someone is actually killed or injured.

This has been another Internet of Things moment of zen.

rocket-landing-attempt (Image source- Space X)

How to make rocket landings a bit safer easier

No one should underestimate how difficult landing a booster rocket is, let alone onto a robot barge that’s sitting in the ocean. The booster has to decelerate to a landing speed on a hatful of fuel, then maintain a fixed orientation to the deck while it descends, all the while counteracting the dynamic effects of a tall thin flexible airframe, fuel slosh, c of g changes, wind and finally landing gear bounce when you do hit. It’s enough to make an autopilot cry. Continue Reading…

Here’s a companion tutorial to the one on integrity level partitioning. This addresses more general software hazards and how to deal with them. Again you can find a more permanent link on my publications page. Enjoy :)

In celebration of upgrading the site to WP Premium here’s some gratuitous eye candy :)

A little more seriously, PIO is one of those problems that, contrary to what the name might imply, requires one to treat the aircraft and pilot as a single control system.

The enigmatic face of HAL

The problem of people

The Hal effect, named after the eponymous anti-hero of Stanley Kubrick and Arthur C. Clarke’s film 2001, is the tendency for designers to implicitly embed their cultural biases into automation. While such biases are undoubtedly a very uncertain guide it might also be worthwhile to look at the 2001 Odyssey mission from Hal’s perspective for a moment. Continue Reading…

Comet (Image source: Public domain)

Amidst all the online soul searching, and pontificating about how to deal with the problem of suicide by airliner, which is let’s face it still a very, very small risk, what you are unlikely to find is any real consideration of how we have arrived at this pass. There is as it turns out a simple one word answer, and that word is efficiency, the dirty little secret of the aviation industry. Continue Reading…

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