Archives For Rail Safety

Cleveland street train overrun (Image source: ATSB)

The final ATSB report, sloppy and flawed

The ATSB has released it’s final report into the Cleveland street overrun and it’s disappointing, at least when it comes to how and why a buffer stop that actually materially contributed to an overrun came to be installed at Cleveland street station. I wasn’t greatly impressed by their preliminary report and asked some questions of the ATSB at the time (their response was polite but not terribly forthcoming) so I decided to see what the final report was like before sitting in judgement.

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Provided as part of the QR show bag for the CORE 2012 conference. The irony of a detachable cab being completely unintentional…

Cleveland street train overrun (Image source: ATSB)

The ATSB has released it’s preliminary report of it’s investigation into the Cleveland street overrun accident which I covered in an earlier post, and it makes interesting reading.

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4100 class crew escape pod #0

On the subject of near misses…

Presumably the use of the crew cab as an escape pod was not actually high on the list of design goals for the 4000 and 4100 class locomotives, and thankfully the locomotives involved in the recent derailment at Ambrose were unmanned.

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yellowbook-rail.org.ukThat much beloved safety engineering handbook of the UK rail industry, the Yellow Book, is back. The handbook has been re-released as the International Handbook Engineering Safety Management (iESM).

Re-development is being carried out by Technical Program Delivery Ltd and the original authoring team of Dr Rob Davis, Paul Cheeseman and Bruce Elliot.

As with the original this incarnation is intended to be advisory rather than mandatory, nor does it tie itself to a particular legislative regime.

Volume one of the iESM containing the key processes in 36 pages is now available free of charge from the iESM’s website, enjoy.

QR Train crash (Image Source: Bayside Bulletin )

It is a fact universally acknowledged that a station platform is invariably in need of a good buffer-stop….

On the 31st of January 2013 a QR commuter train slammed into the end of platform barrier at the Cleveland street station, overrode it and ran into the station structure before coming to rest.

While the media and QR have focused their attention on the reasons for the overrun the failure of the station’s passive defenses against end of track overrun is a more critical concern. Or to put it another way, why did an event as predictable as this, result in the train overriding the platform with potentially fatal consequences?

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The MIL-STD-882 lexicon of hazard analyses includes the System Hazard Analysis (analysis) which according to the standard is intended to:

“…examines the interfaces between subsystems. In so doing, it must integrate the outputs of the SSHA. It should identify safety problem areas of the total system design including safety critical human errors, and assess total system risk. Emphasis is placed on examining the interactions of the subsystems.”

MIL-STD-882C

This sounds reasonable in theory and I’ve certainly seen a number toy examples touted in various text books on what it should look like. But, to be honest, I’ve never really been convinced by such examples, hence this post.

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