An interesting little exposition of the current state of the practice in information risk management using the metaphor of the bald tire on the FAIR wiki. The authors observe that there’s much more shamanistic ritual (dressed up as ‘best practice’) than we’d like to think in risk assessment. A statement that I endorse, actually I think it’s mummery for the most part, but ehem, don’t tell the kids.

Their two fold point. First that while experience and intuition are vital, on their own they give little grip to critical examination. Second that if you want to manage you must measure, and to measure you need to define.

A disclaimer, I’m neither familiar with or a proponent of the FAIR tool, and I strongly doubt as to whether we can ever put risk management onto a truly scientific footing, much like engineering there’s more art than artifice, but it’s an interesting commentary nonetheless.

I give it 011 out 101 tooled up script kiddies.

The chess board is the world, the pieces are the phenomena of the universe, the rules of the game are what we call the laws of Nature. The player on the other side is hidden from us. We know that his play is always fair, just and patient. But we also know, to our cost, that he never overlooks a mistake, or makes the smallest allowance for ignorance.

Thomas Huxley

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Why we should take the safety performance of small samples with a grain of salt

Safety when expressed quantitatively as the probability of a loss over some unit of exposure, is in effect a proportional rate. This is useful as we can compare the performance of different systems or operations when one has of operating hours, and potentially lots of accidents while another has only a few operating hours and therefore fewer accidents. Continue Reading…

Normalisation of deviance

15 Minutes

11/02/2015 — Leave a comment

Matthew Squair:

What the future of high assurance may look like, DARPA’s HACMS, open source and formal from the ground up.

Originally posted on A Critical Systems Blog:

Some of the work I lead at Galois was highlighted in the initial story on 60 Minutes last night, a spot interviewing Dan Kaufman at DARPA. I’m Galois’ principal investigator for the HACMS program, focused on building more reliable software for automobiles and aircraft and other embedded systems. The piece provides a nice overview for the general public on why software security matters and what DARPA is doing about it; HACMS is one piece of that story.

I was busy getting married when filming was scheduled, but two of my colleagues (Dylan McNamee and Pat Hickey) appear in brief cameos in the segment (don’t blink!). Good work, folks! I’m proud of my team and the work we’ve accomplished so far.

You can see more details about how we have been building better programming languages for embedded systems and using them to build unpiloted air vehicle software here.

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A while ago, while I was working on a project that would have been based (in part) in Queensland I was asked to look at the implications of the Registered Professional Engineers Queensland act for the project, and in particular for software development. For those not familiar, the Act provides for the registration of professional engineers to practise in Queensland. If you’re not registered you can’t practice unless you’re supervised by a registered engineer. Upon registering you then become liable to a statutory Board of Professional Engineers for your professional conduct. Oh yes and practicing without coverage is a crime.

While the act is oriented squarely at the provision of professional services, don’t presume that it is solely the concern of consultancies.  Continue Reading…

Exceptional violation