Archives For QF72 accident

Recent incidents involving Airbus aircraft have again focused attention on their approach to cockpit automation and it’s interaction with the crew.

Underlying the current debate is perhaps a general view that the automation should somehow be ‘perfect’, and that failure of automation is also a form of moral failing (1). While this weltanschauung undoubtedly serves certain social and psychological needs the debate it engenders doesn’t really further productive discussion on what could or indeed should be done to improve cockpit automation.

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A cross walk of the interim investigation accident reports issued by the ATSB and BEA for the QF72 and AF447 accidents respectively shows that in both accidents the inertial reference units that are part of the onboard air data inertial reference unit (ADIRU) that exhibited anomalous behaviour also declared a failure. Why did this occur?

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Reading the ATSB interim report on the QF72 in flight accident one could easily overlook the statement, “…the crew reported that the (ECAM (1)) messages were constantly scrolling, and they could not effectively interact with the ECAM to action and/or clear the messages.”. So why did the A330 ECAM display fail during such a critical event?

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The QF 72 in flight pitch upset demonstrates the vulnerability of a redundant and presumed fault tolerant systems to situations where the real world does not accord with the assumptions made by designers.

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