Protocols, security layers and backdoors

11/09/2015 — Leave a comment

It is a common requirement to either load or update applications over the air after a distributed system has been deployed. For embedded systems that are mass market this is in fact a fundamental necessity. Of course once you do have an ability to load remotely there’s a back door that you have to be concerned about, and if the software is part of a vehicle’s control system or an insulin pump controller the consequences of leaving that door unsecured can be dire. To do this securely requires us to tackle the insecurities of the communications protocol head on.

One strategy is to insert a protocol ‘security layer’ between the stack and the application. The security layer then mediate between the application and the Stack to enforce the system’s overall security policy. For example the layer could confirm:

  • that the software update originated from an authenticated source,
  • that the update had not been modified,
  • that the update itself had been authorised, and
  • that the resources required by the downloaded software conform to any onboard safety or security policy.

There are also obvious economy of mechanism advantages when dealing with protocols like the TCP/IP monster. Who after all wants to mess around with the entirety of the TCP/IP stack, given that Richard Stevens took three volumes to define the damn thing? Similarly who wants to go through the entire process again when going from IP5 to IP6? 🙂

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