Search Results For Safety theatre

I guess we’re all aware of the wave of texting while driving legislation, as well as recent moves in a number of jurisdictions to make the penalties more draconian. And it seems like a reasonable supposition that such legislation would reduce the incidence of accidents doesn’t it?

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The safety theatre

11/09/2013

I was reading a post by Ross Anderson on his dismal experiences at John Lewis, and ran across the term security theatre, I’ve actually heard the term, before, it was orignally coined by Bruce Schneier, but this time it got me thinking about how much activity in the safety field is really nothing more than theatrical devices that give the appearance of achieving safety, but not the reality. From zero harm initiatives to hi-vis vests, from the stylised playbook of public consultation to the use of safety integrity levels that purport to show a system is safe. How much of this adds any real value?

Worse yet, and as with security theatre, an entire industry has grown up around this culture of risk, which in reality amounts to a culture of risk aversion in western society. As I see it risk as a cultural concept is like fire, a dangerous tool and an even more terrible master.

Lady Justice (Image source: Jongleur CC-BY-SA-3.0)

Or how I learned to stop worrying about trifles and love the Act

One of the Achilles heels of the current Australian WH&S legislation is that it provides no clear point at which you should stop caring about potential harm. While there are reasons for this, it does mean that we can end up with some theatre of the absurd moments where someone seriously proposes paper cuts as a risk of concern.

The traditional response to such claims of risk is to point out that actually the law rarely concerns itself with such trifles. Or more pragmatically, as you are highly unlikely to be prosecuted over a paper cut it’s not worth worrying about. Continue Reading…

John Adams has an interesting take on the bureaucratic approach to risk management in his post reducing zero risk.

The problem is that each decision to further reduce an already acceptably low risk is always defended as being ‘cheap’, but when you add up the increments it’s the death of a thousand cuts, because no one ever considers the aggregated opportunity cost of course.

This remorseless slide of our public and private institutions into a hysteria of risk aversion seems to me to be be due to an inherent societal psychosis that nations sharing the english common law tradition are prone to. At best we end up with pointless safety theatre, at worst we end up bankrupting our culture.

Over on Emergent Chaos, there’s a post on the unintended consequences of doling out driving privileges to young drivers in stages.

Interestingly the study is circa 2011 but I’ve seen no reflection in Australia on the uncomfortable fact that the study found, i.e that all we are doing with such schemes is shifting the death rate to an older cohort. Of course all the adults can sit back and congratulate themselves on a job well done, except it simply doesn’t work, and worse yet sucks resources and attention away from searching for more effective remedies.

In essence we’ve done nothing as a society to address teenage driving related deaths, safety theatre of the worst sort…

Toyota ECM (Image source: Barr testimony presentation)Economy of mechanism and fail safe defaults

I’ve just finished reading the testimony of Phil Koopman and Michael Barr given for the Toyota un-commanded acceleration lawsuit. Toyota settled after they were found guilty of acting with reckless disregard, but before the jury came back with their decision on punitive damages, and I’m not surprised.

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