Archives For Simplicity

Toyota ECM (Image source: Barr testimony presentation)Economy of mechanism and fail safe defaults

I’ve just finished reading the testimony of Phil Koopman and Michael Barr given for the Toyota un-commanded acceleration lawsuit. Toyota settled after they were found guilty of acting with reckless disregard, but before the jury came back with their decision on punitive damages, and I’m not surprised.

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Soviet Shuttle was safer by design

According to veteran russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, quoted in a New Scientist article the soviet Buran shuttle (1) was much safer than the American shuttle due to fundamental design decisions. Kotov’s comments once again underline the importance to safety of architectural decisions in the early phases of a design.

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The past is prologue to the present

I’m currently reading a report prepared by MIT’s Human and Automation Labs on a conceptual design for the Altair lunar lander’s human machine interface. Continue Reading…

One of the tenets of safety engineering is that simple systems are better. Many practical reasons are advanced to justify this assertion, but I’ve always wondered what, if any, theoretical justification was there for such a position.

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A cross walk of the interim investigation accident reports issued by the ATSB and BEA for the QF72 and AF447 accidents respectively shows that in both accidents the inertial reference units that are part of the onboard air data inertial reference unit (ADIRU) that exhibited anomalous behaviour also declared a failure. Why did this occur?

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