Archives For Assumptions

Technical debt

05/09/2015

St Briavels Castle Debtors Prison (Image source: Public domain)

Paying down the debt

A great term that I’ve just come across, technical debt is a metaphor coined by Ward Cunningham to reflect on how a decision to act expediently for an immediate reason may have longer term consequences. This is a classic problem during design and development where we have to balance various ‘quality’ factors against cost and schedule. The point of the metaphor is that this debt doesn’t go away, the interest on that sloppy or expedient design solution keeps on getting paid every time you make a change and find that it’s harder than it should be. Turning around and ‘fixing’ the design in effect pays back the principal that you originally incurred. Failing to pay off the principal? Well such tales can end darkly. Continue Reading…

Toyota ECM (Image source: Barr testimony presentation)

Comparing and contrasting

In 2010 NASA was called in by the National Highway Transport Safety Administration to help in figuring out the reason for reported unintended Toyota Camry accelerations. They subsequently published a report including a dedicated software annex. What’s interesting to me is the different outcome and conclusions of the two reports regarding software.  Continue Reading…

As Weick pointed out, to manage the unexpected we need to be reliably mindful, not reliably mindless. Obvious as that truism may be, those who invest heavily in plans, procedures, process and policy also end up perpetuating and reinforcing a whole raft of expectations about how the world is, thus investing in an organisational culture of mindlessness rather than mindfulness. Understanding that process inherently elides to a state of organisational mindlessness, we can see that a process oriented risk management standard such as ISO 31000 perversely cultivates a climate of inattentiveness, right where we should be most attentive and mindful. Nor am I alone in my assessment of ISO 31000, see for example John Adams criticism of the standard as  not fit for purpose , or KaplanMike’s assessment of ISO 31000 essentially ‘not relevant‘. Process is no substitute for paying attention.

Don’t get me wrong there’s nothing inherently wrong with a small dollop of process, just that it’s place is not centre stage in an international standard that purports to be about risk, not if you’re looking for an effective outcome. In real life it’s the unexpected, those black swans of Nassim Taleb’s flying in the dark skies of ignorance, that have the most effect, and about which ISO 31000 has nothing to say.

Postscript

Also the application of ISO 31000’s classical risk management to the workplace health and safety may actually be illegal in some jurisdictions (like Australia) where legislation is based on a backwards looking principle of due diligence, rather than a prospective risk based approach to workplace health and safety.

An articulated guess beats an unspoken assumption

Frederick Brooks

A point that Fred Brooks makes in his recent work the Design of Design is that it’s wiser to explicitly make specific assumptions, even if that entails guessing the values, rather than leave the assumption un-stated and vague because ‘we just don’t know’. Brooks notes that while specific and explicit assumptions may be questioned, implicit and vague ones definitely won’t be. If a critical aspect of your design rests upon such fuzzy unarticulated assumptions, then the results can be dire.

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Did the designers of the japanese seawalls consider all the factors?

In an eerie parallel with the Blayais nuclear power plant flooding incident it appears that the designers of tsunami protection for the Japanese coastal cities and infrastructure hit by the 2011 earthquake did not consider all the combinations of environmental factors that go to set the height of a tsunami.

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Thinking about the unintentional and contra-indicating stall warning signal of AF 447 I was struck by the common themes between AF 447 and the Titanic. In both the design teams designed a vehicle compliant to the regulations of the day. But in both cases an implicit design assumption as to how the system would be operated was invalidated.

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Blayais Plant (Image source: Wikipedia Commons)

What a near miss flooding incident at a French nuclear plant in 1999 and the Fukushima 2012 disaster can tell us about fault tolerance and designing for reactor safety

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