Archives For Confirmation bias

To err is human, but to really screw it up takes a team of humans and computers…

How did a state of the art cruiser operated by one of the worlds superpowers end up shooting down an innocent passenger aircraft? To answer that question (at least in part) here’s a case study that’s part of the system safety course I teach that looks at some of the casual factors in the incident.

In the immediate aftermath of this disaster there was a lot of reflection, and work done, on how humans and complex systems interact. However one question that has so far gone unasked is simply this. What if the crew of the USS Vincennes had just used the combat system as it was intended? What would have happened if they’d implemented a doctrinal ruleset that reflected the rules of engagement that they were operating under and simply let the system do its job? After all it was not the software that confused altitude with range on the display, or misused the IFF system, or was confused by track IDs being recycled… no, that was the crew.

One of the trophes I’ve noticed in design projects over the years is the tendency of engineers to instinctively jump from need to a singular conceptual solution. Unfortunately that initial solution rarely stands the test of time, and inevitably at some crisis point there’s a recognition that this will not work and the engineers go back to change the concept, often junking it completely.

Continue Reading…

Battery post fire (Image source: NTSB)

The NTSB has released it’s interim report on the Boeing 787 JAL battery fire and it appears that Boeing’s initial safety assessment had concluded that the only way in which a battery fire would eventuate was through overcharging. Continue Reading…

787 Lithium Battery (Image Source: JTSB)

But, we tested it? Didn’t we?

Earlier reports of the Boeing 787 lithium battery initial development indicated that Boeing engineers had conducted tests to confirm that a single cell failure would not lead to a cascading thermal runaway amongst the remaining batteries. According to these reports their tests were successful, so what went wrong?

Continue Reading…

Well it sounded reasonable…

One of the things that’s concerned me for a while is the potentially malign narrative power of a published safety case. For those unfamiliar with the term, a safety case can be defined as a structured argument supported by a body of evidence that provides a compelling, comprehensible and valid case that a system is safe for a given application in a given environment. And I have not yet read a safety case that didn’t purport to be exactly that.

Continue Reading…