Archives For Framing effect

Silver Blaze (Image source: Strand magazine)

Gregory (Scotland Yard detective): “Is there any other point to which you would wish to draw my attention?”
Holmes: “To the curious incident of the dog in the night-time.”
Gregory: “The dog did nothing in the night-time.”
Holmes: “That was the curious incident.”

What you pay attention to dictates what you’ll miss

The point that the great detective was making was that the absence of something was the evidence which the Scotland Yard detective had overlooked. Holmes of course using imagination and intuition did identify that this was in fact the vital clue. Such a plot device works marvelously well because almost all of us, like detective Gregory, fail to recognise that such an absence is actually ‘there’ in a sense, let alone that it’s important.

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Fraud and framing

21/10/2013 — 1 Comment

In a slight segue, I was reading Bruce Schneier’s blog on security and came across this post on the psychology behind fraud. Bruce points to this post on why, yes I know, ‘good people do bad things’. The explanation that researchers such as Ann Tenbrunsel of Notre Dame offer is that in the same way that we are boundedly rational in other aspects of decision making so to are our ethical decisions.

In particular, the way in which decision problems were framed seems to have a great impact upon how we make decisions. Basically if a problem was framed without an ethical dimension then decision makers were much less likely to consider that aspect.

Additionally to framing effects, researchers found in studying collusion in fraud cases most people seem to act from an honest desire simply to help others, regardless of any attendant ethical issues.

What fascinates me is how closely such research parallels the work in system safer and human error. Clearly if management works within a frame based upon performance and efficiency, they are simply going to overlook the down side completely, and in a desire to be helpful why everyone else ‘goes along for the ride’.

There is as I see it a concrete recommendation that come out of this research that we can apply to safety; that fundamentally safety management systems need to be designed to take account of of our weaknesses as boundedly rational actors.

Cleveland street train overrun (Image source: ATSB)

The ATSB has released it’s preliminary report of it’s investigation into the Cleveland street overrun accident which I covered in an earlier post, and it makes interesting reading.

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4100 class crew escape pod #0

On the subject of near misses…

Presumably the use of the crew cab as an escape pod was not actually high on the list of design goals for the 4000 and 4100 class locomotives, and thankfully the locomotives involved in the recent derailment at Ambrose were unmanned.

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