Archives For Categories of risk

Donald Trump

Image source: AP/LM Otero

A Trump presidency in the wings who’d have thought! And what a total shock it was to all those pollsters, commentators and apparatchiks who are now trying to explain why they got it so wrong. All of which is a textbook example of what students of risk theory call a Black Swan event. Continue Reading…

M1 Risk_Spectrum_redux

A short article on (you guessed it) risk, uncertainty and unpleasant surprises for the 25th Anniversary issue of the UK SCS Club’s Newsletter, in which I introduce a unified theory of risk management that brings together aleatory, epistemic and ontological risk management and formalises the Rumsfeld four quadrant risk model which I’ve used for a while as a teaching aid.

My thanks once again to Felix Redmill for the opportunity to contribute.  đź™‚

Crowely (Image source: Warner Bro's TV)

The psychological basis of uncertainty

There’s a famous psychological experiment conducted by Ellsberg, called eponymously the Ellsberg paradox, in which he showed that people overwhelmingly prefer a betting scenario in which the probabilities are known, rather than one in which the odds are actually ambiguous, even if the potential for winning might be greater.  Continue Reading…

4blackswans

One of the problems that we face in estimating risk driven is that as our uncertainty increases our ability to express it in a precise fashion (e.g. numerically) weakens to the point where for deep uncertainty (1) we definitionally cannot make a direct estimate of risk in the classical sense. Continue Reading…

Inspecting Tacoma Narrows (Image source: Public domain)

We don’t know what we don’t know

The Tacoma Narrows bridge stands, or rather falls, as a classic example of what happens when we run up against the limits of our knowledge. The failure of the bridge due to an as then unknown torsional aeroelastic flutter mode, which the bridge with it’s high span to width ratio was particularly vulnerable to, is almost a textbook example of ontological risk. Continue Reading…

I’ve rewritten my post on epistemic, aleatory and ontological risk pretty much completely, enjoy.

SFAIRP

The current Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) legislation of Australia formalises the common law principle of reasonable practicability in regard to the elimination or minimisation of risks associated with industrial hazards. Having had the advantage of going through this with a couple of clients the above flowchart is my interpretation of what reasonable practicability looks like as a process, annotated with cross references to the legislation and guidance material. What’s most interesting is that the process is determinedly not about tolerance of risk but instead firmly focused on what can reasonably and practicably be done. Continue Reading…