Archives For Climate risk

Black Saturday fires (Image source: ABC)

The consensus project: Yes there is one on climate change

Despite what you may see in the media, yes there is an overwhelming consensus on climate change (it’s happening), what the cause is (our use of fossil fuels) and what we can do about it (a whole bunch of things with today’s tech). Here’s the link to the projects web page, neat info graphics…enjoy.

Oh and if like me you live in Australia I’d start getting used to the increasing frequency of extreme weather events and bush-fires, the only uncertainty left is whether we can put the brakes on in time to prevent a complete catastrophe.

Resilience and common cause considered in the wake of hurricane Sandy

One of the fairly obvious lessons from Hurricane Sandy is the vulnerability of underground infrastructure such as subways, road tunnels and below grade service equipment to flooding events.

The New York City subway system is 108 years old, but it has never faced a disaster as devastating as what we experienced last night”

NYC transport director Joseph Lhota

Yet despite the obviousness of the risk we still insist on placing such services and infrastructure below grade level. Considering actual rises in mean sea level, e.g a 1 foot increase at Battery Park NYC since 1900, and those projected to occur this century perhaps now is the time to recompute the likelihood and risk of storm surges overtopping defensive barriers.

Continue Reading…

The Mississippi River’s Old River Control Structure, a National Single Point of Failure?

Given the recent events in Fukushima and our subsequent western cultural obsession with the radiological consequences, perhaps it’s appropriate to reflect on other non-nuclear vulnerabilities. A case in point is the Old River Control Structure erected by those busy chaps the US Army Corp of Engineers to control the path of the Mississippi to the sea. Well as it turns out trapping the Mississippi wasn’t really such a good idea…

Continue Reading…

The IPCC issued a set of lead author guidance notes on how to describe uncertainty prior to the fourth IPCC assessment. In it the IPCC laid out a methodology on how to deal with various classes of uncertainty. Unforunately the IPCC guidance also fell into a fatal trap.

Continue Reading...

Way off topic for this blog but I watched the ABC’s 7:30 current affair report on thursday in which Kevin, our illustrious prime minister, was put on the spot about why he has publically supported Australia having a population of 35 million people. His response? Well basically his argument was “it’s bigger than both of us so jus lie back and enjoy it”.

Continue Reading...

The Newcastle 2007 storm

In part one and part two of this post I looked at Drew Warne Smith and James Madden’s article, “The science is in on sea-level rise: 1.7 mm”, in terms of it’s worth as a logical argument.

We live under a government of men and morning newspapers.

Wendell Phillips

While Smith and Madden’s argument turns out to be the usual denialist slumgullion it does serve as a useful jump off point for a discussion of the role of the media in propagating such pernicious memes (1) and more broadly in communicating risk. Continue Reading…

The Newcastle 2007 storm

In the first part of this post on Drew Warne Smith and James Madden’s article on climate change, The science is in on sea-level rise: 1.7 mm, I dealt with the factual basis of their argument.

The moment we want to believe something, we suddenly see all the arguments for it, and become blind to the arguments against it.

George Bernard Shaw

In this second part I want to spend some time looking at both the logical and psychological tricks of their argument (such as it is) and how the authors use these fallacious elements to sway the unwary or uneducated readership. Note that I have based the taxonomy of argument upon that proposed by Thoulesss (1934) (1).

Continue Reading…