Archives For Safety Integrity Levels (SILs)

Why probability is not corroboration

The IEC’s 61508 standard on functional safety  assigns a series of Safety Integrity Levels (SIL) that correlate to the achievement of specific hazardous failure rates. Unfortunately this definition of SILs, that ties SILs to a probabilistic metric of failure, contains a fatal flaw.

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Screwtape(Image source: end time info)

A short (and possibly evil) treatise on SILs from our guest blogger

May I introduce myself?

The name’s Screwtape, some of you might have heard of me from that short and nasty book by C.S. Lewis. All lies of course, and I would know, about lies that is… baboom tish! Anyway the world has moved on and I’m sure that you’d be completely unsurprised to hear that I’ve branched out into software consulting now. I do find the software industry one that is oh so over-ripe for the plucking of immortal souls, ah but I digress. Your good host has asked me here today to render a few words on the question of risk based safety integrity levels and how to turn such pesky ideals, akin in many ways to those other notions of christian virtue, to your own ends. Continue Reading…

I was cleaning out my (metaphorical) sock drawer and came across this rough guide to the workings of the Australian Defence standard on software safety DEF(AUST) 5679. The guide was written around 2006 for Issue 1 of the standard, although many of the issues it discussed persisted into Issue 2, which hit the streets in 2008.

DEF (AUST) 5679 is an interesting standard, one can see that the authors, Tony Cant amongst them, put a lot of thought into the methodology behind the standard, unfortunately it’s suffered from a failure to achieve large scale adoption and usage.

So here’s my thoughts at the time on how to actually use the standard to best advantage, I also threw in some concepts on how to deal with xOTS components within the DEF (AUST) 5679 framework.

Enjoy 🙂

Buncefield Tank on Fire (Image Source: Royal Chiltern Air Support Unit)

Why sometimes simpler is better in safety engineering.

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While reading the 2006 Buncefield investigation report I came across this interesting statement.

“Such sensors are in widespread use and a number are available that have been certified for use in SIL2/3 applications in accordance with BS EN 61511 (1) .”

Buncefield Major Incident Investigation Report, Volume 2 Annex 4, p 28 (2006).

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I was thinking about how the dubious concept of ‘safety integrity levels’ continues to persist in spite of protracted criticism. in essence if the flaws in the concept of SILs are so obvious why they still persist?

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