Archives For Safety

The practice of safety engineering in various high consequence industries.

…it is comparatively easy to make computers exhibit adult level performance on intelligence tests or playing checkers, and difficult or impossible to give them the skills of a one-year-old when it comes to perception and mobility.

Hans Moravec

Uber’s safety management woes

We shouldn’t be killing people in our haste to get to a safe future

Dr Phil Koopman (on driverless cars)

Here’s a view from inside Tesla by one of it’s former employees. Taking the report at face value, which is of course an arguable proposition, you can see how technical debt can build up to a point where it’s near impossible to pay it down. That in turn can have significant effects on the safety performance of the organisation, see the Toyota spaghetti code case as another example. The take home for this is for any software safety effort it’s a good idea to see whether the company/team is measuring technical debt in a meaningful fashion and are actively retiring it, for example by alternating capability and maintenance updates.

Tesla and technical debt.

https://mobile.twitter.com/atomicthumbs/status/1032939617404645376

It is highly questionable whether total system safety is always enhanced by allocating functions to automatic devices rather than human operators, and there is some reason to believe that flight-deck automation may have already passed its optimum point.

Earl Wiener (1980)

If you want to know where Crew Resource Management as a discipline started, then you need to read NASA Technical Memorandum 78482 or “A Simulator Study of the Interaction of Pilot Workload With Errors, Vigilance, and Decisions” by H.P. Ruffel Smith, the British borne physician and pilot. Before this study it was hours in the seat and line seniority that mattered when things went to hell. After it the aviation industry started to realise that crews rose or fell on the basis of how well they worked together, and that a good captain got the best out of his team. Today whether crews get it right, as they did on QF72, or terribly wrong, as they did on AF447, the lens that we view their performance through has been irrevocably shaped by the work of Russel Smith. From little seeds great oaks grow indeed.

AI winter