Archives For Space exploration safety

rocket-landing-attempt (Image source- Space X)

How to make rocket landings a bit safer easier

No one should underestimate how difficult landing a booster rocket is, let alone onto a robot barge that’s sitting in the ocean. The booster has to decelerate to a landing speed on a hatful of fuel, then maintain a fixed orientation to the deck while it descends, all the while counteracting the dynamic effects of a tall thin flexible airframe, fuel slosh, c of g changes, wind and finally landing gear bounce when you do hit. It’s enough to make an autopilot cry. Continue Reading…

NASA safety handbook cover

Way, way back in 2011 NASA published the first volume of their planned two volume epic on system safety titled strangely enough “NASA System Safety Handbook Volume 1, System Safety Framework and Concepts for Implementation“, catchy eh?

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Mars code: JPL and risk based design

Monument to the conquerors of space Moscow (Copyright)

Engineers as the agents of evolution

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Reflecting on learning in the aftermath of disaster

There’s been a lot of ink expended on examinations of the causes of the Challenger disaster, whose anniversary passed quietly by yesterday, but are we really the wiser for it?

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Why NASA is like British Rail

Well more precisely, the structural changes that the American space program is undergoing are akin to those that the British rail industry under went during the 1980s.

The past of space transportation in the US is fundamentally defined by NASA, a large, government owned, monolithic, monopolistic, vertically integrated organisation. Sound familiar? It ought, the same description could be applied to the United Kingdom’s British Rail of the 1980s.

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Soviet Shuttle was safer by design

According to veteran russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov, quoted in a New Scientist article the soviet Buran shuttle (1) was much safer than the American shuttle due to fundamental design decisions. Kotov’s comments once again underline the importance to safety of architectural decisions in the early phases of a design.

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