Archives For Internet of Things

Cautionary tales from the Internet of Things

Second part of the SBS documentary on line now. Looking at the IoT this episode. 

The internet goes nuclear

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A clank of botnets

More bad news for the Internet this week as a plague of BotNets launched a successful wave of denial of service attacks on Dyn, a dynamic domain name service provider. The attacks on Dyn propagated through to services such as Twitter (OK no great loss), Github, The Verge, Playstation Network, Box and Wix. Continue Reading…

It is a common requirement to either load or update applications over the air after a distributed system has been deployed. For embedded systems that are mass market this is in fact a fundamental necessity. Of course once you do have an ability to load remotely there’s a back door that you have to be concerned about, and if the software is part of a vehicle’s control system or an insulin pump controller the consequences of leaving that door unsecured can be dire. To do this securely requires us to tackle the insecurities of the communications protocol head on.

One strategy is to insert a protocol ‘security layer’ between the stack and the application. The security layer then mediate between the application and the Stack to enforce the system’s overall security policy. For example the layer could confirm:

  • that the software update originated from an authenticated source,
  • that the update had not been modified,
  • that the update itself had been authorised, and
  • that the resources required by the downloaded software conform to any onboard safety or security policy.

There are also obvious economy of mechanism advantages when dealing with protocols like the TCP/IP monster. Who after all wants to mess around with the entirety of the TCP/IP stack, given that Richard Stevens took three volumes to define the damn thing? Similarly who wants to go through the entire process again when going from IP5 to IP6? 🙂

Jeep (Image source: Andy Greenberg/Wired)

A big shout out to the Chrysler-Jeep control systems design team, it turns out that flat and un-partitioned architectures are not so secure, after security experts Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek demonstrated the ability to remotely take over a Jeep via the internet and steer it into a ditch. Chrysler has now patched the Sprint/UConnect vulnerability, and subsequently issued a recall notice for 1.4 million vehicles which requires owners to download a car security patch onto a USB stick then plug it into their car to update the firmware. So a big well done Chrysler-Jeep guys, you win this years Toyota Spaghetti Monster prize* for outstanding contributions to embedded systems design.

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The offending PCA serial cable linking the comms module to the motherboard (Image source: Billy Rios)

Hannibal ante portas!

A recent article in Wired discloses how hospital drug pumps can be hacked and the firmware controlling them modified at will. Although in theory the comms module and motherboard should be separated by an air gap, in practice there’s a serial link cunningly installed to allow firmware to be updated via the interwebz.

As the Romans found, once you’ve built a road that a legion can march down it’s entirely possible for Hannibal and his elephants to march right up it. Thus proving once again, if proof be needed, that there’s nothing really new under the sun. In a similar vein we probably won’t see any real reform in this area until someone is actually killed or injured.

This has been another Internet of Things moment of zen.

More speed bumps on the road to the Internet of Everything

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