Archives For Fault tolerance

So here’s a question for the safety engineers at Airbus. Why display unreliable airspeed data if it truly is that unreliable?

In slightly longer form. If (for example) air data is so unreliable that your automation needs to automatically drop out of it’s primary mode, and your QRH procedure is then to manually fly pitch and thrust (1) then why not also automatically present a display page that only provides the data that pilots can trust and is needed to execute the QRH procedure (2)? Not doing so smacks of ‘awkward automation’ where the engineers automate the easy tasks but leave the hard tasks to the human, usually with comments in the flight manual to the effect that, “as it’s way too difficult to cover all failure scenarios in the software it’s over to you brave aviator” (3). This response is however something of a cop out as what is needed is not a canned response to such events but rather a flexible decision and situational awareness (SA) toolset that can assist the aircrew in responding to unprecedented events (see for example both QF72 and AF447) that inherently demand sense-making as a precursor to decision making (4). Some suggestions follow:

  1. Redesign the attitude display with articulated pitch ladders, or a Malcom’s horizon to improve situational awareness.
  2. Provide a fallback AoA source using an AoA estimator.
  3. Provide actual direct access to flight data parameters such as mach number and AoA to support troubleshooting (5).
  4. Provide an ability to ‘turn off’ coupling within calculated air data to allow rougher but more robust processing to continue.
  5. Use non-aristotlean logic to better model the trustworthiness of air data.
  6. Provide the current master/slave hierarchy status amongst voting channels to aircrew.
  7. Provide an obvious and intuitive way to  to remove a faulted channel allowing flight under reversionary laws (7).
  8. Inform aircrew as to the specific protection mode activation and the reasons (i.e. flight data) triggering that activation (8).

As aviation systems get deeper and more complex this need to support aircrew in such events will not diminish, in fact it is likely to increase if the past history of automation is any guide to the future.

Notes

1. The BEA report on the AF447 disaster surveyed Airbus pilots for their response to unreliable airspeed and found that in most cases aircrew, rather sensibly, put their hands in their laps as the aircraft was already in a safe state and waited for the icing induced condition to clear.

2. Although the Airbus Back Up Speed Display (BUSS) does use angle-of-attack data to provide a speed range and GPS height data to replace barometric altitude it has problems at high altitude where mach number rather than speed becomes significant and the stall threshold changes with mach number (which it doesn’t not know). As a result it’s use is 9as per Airbus manuals) below 250 FL.

3. What system designers do, in the abstract, is decompose and allocate system level behaviors to system components. Of course once you do that you then need to ensure that the component can do the job, and has the necessary support. Except ‘apparently’ if the component in question is a human and therefore considered to be outside’ your system.

4. Another way of looking at the problem is that the automation is the other crew member in the cockpit. Such tools allow the human and automation to ‘discuss’ the emerging situation in a meaningful (and low bandwidth) way so as to develop a shared understanding of the situation (6).

5. For example in the Airbus design although AoA and Mach number are calculated by the ADR and transmitted to the PRIM fourteen times a second they are not directly available to aircrew.

6. Yet another way of looking at the problem is that the principles of ecological design needs to be applied to the aircrew task of dealing with contingency situations.

7. For example in the Airbus design the current procedure is to reach up above the Captain’s side of the overhead instrument panel, and deselect two ADRs…which ones and the criterion to choose which ones are not however detailed by the manufacturer.

8. As the QF72 accident showed, where erroneous flight data triggers a protection law it is important to indicate what the flight protection laws are responding to.

Here’s a companion tutorial to the one on integrity level partitioning. This addresses more general software hazards and how to deal with them. Again you can find a more permanent link on my publications page. Enjoy 🙂

Unreliable airspeed events pose a significant challenge (and safety risk) because such situations throw onto aircrew the most difficult (and error prone) of human cognitive tasks, that of ‘understanding’ a novel situation. This results in a double whammy for unreliable airspeed incidents. That is the likelihood of an error in ‘understanding’ is far greater than any other error type, and having made that sort of error it’s highly likely that it’s going to be a fatal one. Continue Reading…

And not quite as simple as you think…

The testimony of Michael Barr, in the recent Oklahoma Toyota court case highlighted problems with the design of Toyota’s watchdog timer for their Camry ETCS-i  throttle control system, amongst other things, which got me thinking about the pervasive role that watchdogs play in safety critical systems. The great strength of watchdogs is of course that they provide a safety mechanism which resides outside the state machine, which gives them fundamental design independence from what’s going on inside. By their nature they’re also simple and small scale beasts, thereby satisfying the economy of mechanism principle.

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Toyota ECM (Image source: Barr testimony presentation)Economy of mechanism and fail safe defaults

I’ve just finished reading the testimony of Phil Koopman and Michael Barr given for the Toyota un-commanded acceleration lawsuit. Toyota settled after they were found guilty of acting with reckless disregard, but before the jury came back with their decision on punitive damages, and I’m not surprised.

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Singularity (Image source: Tecnoscience)

Or ‘On the breakdown of Bayesian techniques in the presence of knowledge singularities’

One of the abiding problems of safety critical ‘first of’ systems is that you face, as David Collingridge observed, a double bind dilemma:

  1. Initially an information problem because ‘real’ safety issues (hazards) and their risk cannot be easily identified or quantified until the system is deployed, but 
  2. By the time the system is deployed you now face a power (inertia) problem, that is control or change is difficult once the system is deployed or delivered. Eliminating a hazard is usually very difficult and we can only mitigate them in some fashion. Continue Reading…

Ariane 501 Launch

In 1996 the European Space Agency lost their brand new Ariane 5 launcher on it’s first flight. Here’s a recently updated annotated version of that report. I’d also note that the software that faulted was written using Ada a ‘strongly typed’ language, which does point to a few small problems with the use of such languages.

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New Battery boxes (Image source: Boeing)

The end of the matter…well almost

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Unusual attitude

28/02/2013

No, not the alternative name for this blog. 🙂

I’ve just given the post Pitch ladders and unusual attitude a solid rewrite adding some new material and looking a little more deeply at some of the underlying safety myths.


JAL JA829J Fire (Image Source: Stephan Savoia AP Photo)

Boeing’s Dreamliner program runs into trouble with lithium ion batteries

Lithium batteries performance in providing lightweight, low volume power storage has made them a ubiquitous part of modern consumer life. And high power density also makes them attractive in applications, such as aerospace, where weight and space are at a premium. Unfortunately lithium batteries are also very unforgiving if operated outside their safe operating envelope and can fail in a spectacularly energetic fashion called a thermal runaway (1), as occurred in the recent JAL and ANA 787 incidents.

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Resilience and common cause considered in the wake of hurricane Sandy

One of the fairly obvious lessons from Hurricane Sandy is the vulnerability of underground infrastructure such as subways, road tunnels and below grade service equipment to flooding events.

The New York City subway system is 108 years old, but it has never faced a disaster as devastating as what we experienced last night”

NYC transport director Joseph Lhota

Yet despite the obviousness of the risk we still insist on placing such services and infrastructure below grade level. Considering actual rises in mean sea level, e.g a 1 foot increase at Battery Park NYC since 1900, and those projected to occur this century perhaps now is the time to recompute the likelihood and risk of storm surges overtopping defensive barriers.

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The following is an extract from Kevin Driscoll’s Murphy Was an Optimist presentation at SAFECOMP 2010. Here Kevin does the maths to show how a lack of exposure to failures over a small sample size of operating hours leads to a normalcy bias amongst designers and a rejection of proposed failure modes as ‘not credible’. The reason I find it of especial interest is that it gives, at least in part, an empirical argument to why designers find it difficult to anticipate the system accidents of Charles Perrow’s Normal Accident Theory. Kevin’s argument also supports John Downer’s (2010) concept of Epistemic accidents. John defines epistemic accidents as those that occur because of an erroneous technological assumption, even though there were good reasons to hold that assumption before the accident. Kevin’s argument illustrates that engineers as technological actors must make decisions in which their knowledge is inherently limited and so their design choices will exhibit bounded rationality.

In effect the higher the dependability of a system the greater the mismatch between designer experience and system operational hours and therefore the tighter the bounds on the rationality of design choices and their underpinning assumptions. The tighter the bounds the greater the effect of congnitive biases will have, e.g. such as falling prey to the Normalcy Bias. Of course there are other reasons for such bounded rationality, see Logic, Mathematics and Science are Not Enough for a discussion of these.

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This post is part of the Airbus aircraft family and system safety thread.

I’m currently reading Richard de Crespigny’s book on flight QF 32. In he writes that he felt at one point that he was being over whelmed by the number and complexity of ECAM messages. At that moment he recalled remembering a quote from Gene Kranz, NASA’s flight director, of Apollo 13 fame, “Hold it Gentlemen, Hold it! I don’t care about what went wrong. I need to know what is still working on that space craft.”.

The crew of QF32 are not alone in experiencing the overwhelming flood of data that a modern control system can produce in a crisis situation. Their experience is similar to that of the operators of the Three Mile island nuclear plant who faced a daunting 100+ near simultaneous alarms, or more recently the experiences of QF 72.

The take home point for designers is that, if you’ve carefully constructed a fault monitoring and management system you also need to consider the situation where the damage to the system is so severe that the needs of the operator invert and they need to know ‘what they’ve still got’, rather that what they don’t have.

The term ‘never give up design strategy’ is bandied around in the fault tolerance community, the above lesson should form at least a part of any such strategy.

Stage Separation – A Classic Irreversible Command

The concept of irreversible commands is one that has been around for a long time in the safety and aerospace communities, but why are they significant from a safety perspective?

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A330 Right hand (1 & 3) AoA probes (Image source: ATSB)

In an earlier post I commented that in the QF72 incident the use of a geometric mean (1) instead of the arithmetic mean when calculating the aircrafts angle of attack would have reduced the severity of the subsequent pitch over. Which leads into the more general subject of what to do when the real world departs from our assumption about the statistical ‘well formededness’ of data. The problem, in the case of measuring angle of attack on commercial aircraft, is that the left and right alpha sensors are not truly independent measures of the same parameter (2). With sideslip we cannot directly obtain a true angle of attack (AoA) from any single sensor (3) so need to take the average (mean) of the measured AoA on either side of the fuselage (Gracey 1958) to determine the true AoA. Because of this variance between left and right we cannot use a median voting approach, as we can expect the two sensors the right side to differ from the one sensor on the left. As a result we end up having to use the mean of two sensor values (one from each side) as an estimate of the resultant central tendency.

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A near disaster in space 40 years ago serves as a salutory lesson on Common Cause Failure (CCF)

Two days after the launch of Apollo 13 an oxygen tank ruptured crippling the Apollo service module upon which the the astronauts depended for survival, precipitating a desperate life or death struggle for survival. But leaving aside what was possibly NASA’s finest hour, the causes of this near disaster provide important lessons for design damage resistant architectures.

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What a near miss flooding incident at a french reactor plant in 1999, it’s aftermath and the subsequent Fukushima plant disaster can tell us about fault tolerance and designing for reactor safety.

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