Archives For Failure classes

Unreliable airspeed events pose a significant challenge (and safety risk) because such situations throw onto aircrew the most difficult (and error prone) of human cognitive tasks, that of ‘understanding’ a novel situation. This results in a double whammy for unreliable airspeed incidents. That is the likelihood of an error in ‘understanding’ is far greater than any other error type, and having made that sort of error it’s highly likely that it’s going to be a fatal one. Continue Reading…

New Battery boxes (Image source: Boeing)

The end of the matter…well almost

Continue Reading…

Resilience and common cause considered in the wake of hurricane Sandy

One of the fairly obvious lessons from Hurricane Sandy is the vulnerability of underground infrastructure such as subways, road tunnels and below grade service equipment to flooding events.

The New York City subway system is 108 years old, but it has never faced a disaster as devastating as what we experienced last night”

NYC transport director Joseph Lhota

Yet despite the obviousness of the risk we still insist on placing such services and infrastructure below grade level. Considering actual rises in mean sea level, e.g a 1 foot increase at Battery Park NYC since 1900, and those projected to occur this century perhaps now is the time to recompute the likelihood and risk of storm surges overtopping defensive barriers.

Continue Reading…

A near disaster in space 40 years ago serves as a salutory lesson on Common Cause Failure (CCF)

Two days after the launch of Apollo 13 an oxygen tank ruptured crippling the Apollo service module upon which the the astronauts depended for survival, precipitating a desperate life or death struggle for survival. But leaving aside what was possibly NASA’s finest hour, the causes of this near disaster provide important lessons for design damage resistant architectures.

Continue Reading…