Archives For Never give up strategy

Here’s a companion tutorial to the one on integrity level partitioning. This addresses more general software hazards and how to deal with them. Again you can find a more permanent link on my publications page. Enjoy 🙂

And not quite as simple as you think…

The testimony of Michael Barr, in the recent Oklahoma Toyota court case highlighted problems with the design of Toyota’s watchdog timer for their Camry ETCS-i  throttle control system, amongst other things, which got me thinking about the pervasive role that watchdogs play in safety critical systems. The great strength of watchdogs is of course that they provide a safety mechanism which resides outside the state machine, which gives them fundamental design independence from what’s going on inside. By their nature they’re also simple and small scale beasts, thereby satisfying the economy of mechanism principle.

Continue Reading…

No, not the alternative name for this blog. 🙂

I’ve just given the post Pitch ladders and unusual attitude a solid rewrite adding some new material and looking a little more deeply at some of the underlying safety myths.

This post is part of the Airbus aircraft family and system safety thread.

I’m currently reading Richard de Crespigny’s book on flight QF 32. In he writes that he felt at one point that he was being over whelmed by the number and complexity of ECAM messages. At that moment he recalled remembering a quote from Gene Kranz, NASA’s flight director, of Apollo 13 fame, “Hold it Gentlemen, Hold it! I don’t care about what went wrong. I need to know what is still working on that space craft.”.

The crew of QF32 are not alone in experiencing the overwhelming flood of data that a modern control system can produce in a crisis situation. Their experience is similar to that of the operators of the Three Mile island nuclear plant who faced a daunting 100+ near simultaneous alarms, or more recently the experiences of QF 72.

The take home point for designers is that, if you’ve carefully constructed a fault monitoring and management system you also need to consider the situation where the damage to the system is so severe that the needs of the operator invert and they need to know ‘what they’ve still got’, rather that what they don’t have.

The term ‘never give up design strategy’ is bandied around in the fault tolerance community, the above lesson should form at least a part of any such strategy.