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Apparently 2 million Australians trying to use the one ABS website because they’re convinced the government will fine them if they don’t is the freshly minted definition of “Distributed Denial of Service (DDOS)” attack.🙂

Alternative theory, who would have thought that foreign nationals (oh all right, we all know it’s the Chinese*) might try to disrupt the census in revenge for those drug cheat comments at the Olympics?

Interesting times. I hope the AEC is taking notes for their next go at electronic voting

#censusfail

#Censusfail

09/08/2016 — 2 Comments

Currently enjoying watching the ABS Census website burn to the ground. Ah schadenfreude, how sweet you are. 

Census time again, and those practical jokers at the Australian Bureau of Statistics have managed to spring a beauty on the Australian public. The  joke being that, rather than collecting the data anonymously you are now required to fill in your name and address which the ABS will retain (1). This is a bad idea, in fact it’s a very bad idea, not quite as bad as say getting stuck in a never ending land war in the Middle East, but certainly much worse than experiments in online voting. Continue Reading…

Inertia has a thousand fathers…

Matthew Squair

Challenger_flight_51-l_crew

Vale Challenger

The anniversary of the loss of Challenger passed by on thursday. In memorium, I’ve updated my post that deals with the failure of communication that I think lies at the heart of that disaster.

The first principle is that you must not fool yourself and you are the easiest person to fool.

Richard P. Feynman

Here’s a copy of the presentation that I gave at ASSC 2015 on how to use MIL-STD-882C to demonstrate compliance to the WHS Act 2011. The Model Australian Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) Act places new and quite onerous requirements upon manufacturer, suppliers and end users organisations. These new requirements include the requirement to demonstrate due diligence in the discharge of individual and corporate responsibilities. Traditionally contracts have steered clear of invoking Workplace Health and Safety (WHS) legislation in anything other than a most abstract form, unfortunately such traditional approaches provide little evidence with which to demonstrate compliance with the WHS act.

The presentation describes an approach to establishing compliance with the WHS Act (2011) using the combination of a contracted MIL-STD-882C system safety program and a compliance finding methodology. The advantages and effectiveness of this approach in terms of establishing compliance with the act and the effective discharge the responsibilities of both supplier and acquirer are illustrated using a case study of a major aircraft modification program. Limitations of the approach are then discussed given the significant difference between the decision making criteria of classic systems safety and the so far as is reasonably practicable principle.