Census time again, and those practical jokers at the Australian Bureau of Statistics have managed to spring a beauty on the Australian public. The  joke being that, rather than collecting the data anonymously you are now required to fill in your name and address which the ABS will retain (1). This is a bad idea, in fact it’s a very bad idea, not quite as bad as say getting stuck in a never ending land war in the Middle East, but certainly much worse than experiments in online voting. Continue Reading…

MH370 underwater search area map (Image source- Australian Govt)

After millions of dollars and years of effort the ATSB has suspended it’s search for the wreck of MH370. There’s some bureaucratic weasel words, but we are done people. Of course had the ATSB applied Bayesian search techniques, as the USN did in the successful search for it’s missing  USS Scorpion, we might actually know where it is.

One can construct convincing proofs quite readily of the ultimate futility of exhaustive testing of a program and even of testing by sampling. So how can one proceed? The role of testing, in theory, is to establish the base propositions of an inductive proof. You should convince yourself, or other people, as firmly as possible, that if the program works a certain number of times on specified data, then it will always work on any data. This can be done by an inductive approach to the proof.

Tony Hoare

M1 Risk_Spectrum_redux

A short article on (you guessed it) risk, uncertainty and unpleasant surprises for the 25th Anniversary issue of the UK SCS Club’s Newsletter, in which I introduce a unified theory of risk management that brings together aleatory, epistemic and ontological risk management and formalises the Rumsfeld four quadrant risk model which I’ve used for a while as a teaching aid.

My thanks once again to Felix Redmill for the opportunity to contribute.  :)

Joshua Brown screen grab

Keep your eyes on the road, and your hands upon the wheel…

The first fatality involving the use of Tesla’s autopilot* occurred last May. The Guardian reported that the autopilot sensors on the Model S failed to distinguish a white tractor-trailer crossing the highway against a bright sky and promptly tried to drive under the trailer, with decapitating results. What’s emerged is that the driver had a history of driving at speed and also of using the automation beyond the maker’s intent, e.g. operating the vehicle hands off rather than hands on, as the screen grab above indicates. Indeed recent reports indicate that immediately prior to the accident he was travelling fast (maybe too fast) whilst watching a Harry Potter DVD. There also appears to be a community of like minded spirits out there who are intent on seeing how far they can push the automation… sigh.  Continue Reading…

System Safety Fundamentals Concept Cloud

Have just updated the safety case module for the system safety course I teach at UNSW. Have revised it to include John Rushby’s approach to determining the soundness and strength of a safety argument (I like his simplification and separation of concerns strategy). Enjoy!