Archives For ATSB

MH370 underwater search area map (Image source- Australian Govt)

After millions of dollars and years of effort the ATSB has suspended it’s search for the wreck of MH370. There’s some bureaucratic weasel words, but we are done people. Of course had the ATSB applied Bayesian search techniques, as the USN did in the successful search for it’s missing  USS Scorpion, we might actually know where it is.

MH 370 search vessel (Image source: ATSB)

Once more with feeling

Sonar vessels searching for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean may have missed the jet, the ATSB’s Chief Commissioner Martin Dolan has told News Online. he went on to point out the uncertainties involved, the difficulty of terrain that could mask the signature of wreckage and that therefore problematic areas would need to be re-surveyed. Despite all that the Commissioner was confident that the wreckage site would be found by June. Me I’m not so sure.

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qantas-vh-vzr-737-838-640x353

Deconstructing a tail strike incident

On August 1 last year, a Qantas 737-838 (VH-VZR) suffered a tail-strike while taking off from Sydney airport, and this week the ATSB released it’s report on the incident. The ATSB narrative is essentially that when working out the plane’s Takeoff Weight (TOW) on a notepad, the captain forgot to carry the ‘1’ which resulted in an erroneous weight of 66,400kg rather than 76,400kg. Subsequently the co-pilot made a transposition error when carrying out the same calculation on the Qantas iPad resident on-board performance tool (OPT), in this case transposing 6 for 7 in the fuel weight resulting in entering 66,400kg into the OPT. A cross check of the OPT calculated Vref40 speed value against that calculated by the FMC (which uses the aircraft Zero Fuel Weight (ZFW) input rather than TOW to calculate Vref40) would have picked the error up, but the crew mis-interpreted the check and so it was not performed correctly. Continue Reading…

An interesting post by Mike Thicke over at Cloud Chamber on the potential use of prediction markets to predict the location of MH370. Prediction markets integrate ‘diffused’ knowledge using a market mechanism to derive a predicted likelihood, essentially market prices are assigned to various outcomes and are treated as analogs of their likelihood. Market trading then established what the market ‘thinks’ is the value of each outcome. The technique has a long and colourful history, but it does seem to work. As an aside prediction markets are still predicting a No vote in the upcoming referendum on Scottish Independence despite recent polls to the contrary.

Returning to the MH370 saga, if the ATSB is not intending to use a Bayesian search plan then one could in principle crowd source the effort through such a prediction market. One could run the market in a dynamic fashion with the market prices updating as new information comes in from the ongoing search. Any investors out there?

Cleveland street train overrun (Image source: ATSB)

The final ATSB report, sloppy and flawed

The ATSB has released it’s final report into the Cleveland street overrun and it’s disappointing, at least when it comes to how and why a buffer stop that actually materially contributed to an overrun came to be installed at Cleveland street station. I wasn’t greatly impressed by their preliminary report and asked some questions of the ATSB at the time (their response was polite but not terribly forthcoming) so I decided to see what the final report was like before sitting in judgement.

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Airbuses side stick improves crew comfort and control, but is there a hidden cost?

This post is part of the Airbus aircraft family and system safety thread.

The Airbus FBW side stick flight control has vastly improved the comfort of aircrew flying the Airbus fleet, much as the original Airbus designers predicted (Corps 1988). But the implementation also expresses the Airbus approach to flight control laws and that companies implicit assumption about the way in which humans interact with automation and each other. Here the record is more problematic.

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A small question for the ATSB

According to the preliminary ATSB report the crew of QF32 took approximately 50 minutes to process all the Electronic Centralised Aircraft Monitor (ECAM) messages. This was despite this normal crew of three being augmented by a check captain in training and a senior check captain.

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