Archives For B-777

Tweedle Dum and Dee (Image source: Wikipedia Commons)
How do ya do and shake hands, shake hands, shake hands. How do ya do and shake hands and state your name and business…

Lewis Carrol, Through the Looking Glass

You would have thought after the Leveson and Knight experiments that the  theory that independently written software would only contain independent faults was dead and buried, another beautiful theory shot down by hard cold fact.  But unfortunately like many great errors the theory of n-versioning keeps on keeping on (1).
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Last week the FAA released an Airworthiness Directive (2010-06-09) for the Boeing 777 aircraft to prevent inadvertent engagement of the autopilot during takeoff roll, which could result in a rejected takeoff a runway overrun. But what are the deeper issues behind the incident?

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DO-178B and the B-777 9M-MRG Incident

In August 2005 a Boeing 777 experienced an in-flight upset caused by the aircraft’s Air Data Inertial Reference Unit (ADIRU), generating erroneous acceleration data. The software fault that caused this upset raises questions in turn about the DO-178 software development process. A subsequent investigation of the accident by the Australian Transportation Board (ATSB) identified that the following had occured:

  • accelerometer #5 failed on the first of June in a false high value output mode,
  • the ADIRU excluded accelerometer #5 from use in its computations,
  • the ADIRU unit remained in service with this failed component (1),
  • power to the ADIRU was cycled (causing a system reset),
  • accelerometer #6 then failed in-flight,
  • accelerometer #6 was excluded from use by the ADIRU,
  • the ADIRU then re-admitted accelerometer #5 into its computations, and
  • erroneous acceleration values were output to the flight computer.

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