Archives For ISO 31000

As Weick pointed out, to manage the unexpected we need to be reliably mindful, not reliably mindless. Obvious as that truism may be, those who invest heavily in plans, procedures, process and policy also end up perpetuating and reinforcing a whole raft of expectations about how the world is, thus investing in an organisational culture of mindlessness rather than mindfulness. Understanding that process inherently elides to a state of organisational mindlessness, we can see that a process oriented risk management standard such as ISO 31000 perversely cultivates a climate of inattentiveness, right where we should be most attentive and mindful. Nor am I alone in my assessment of ISO 31000, see for example John Adams criticism of the standard as  not fit for purpose , or KaplanMike’s assessment of ISO 31000 essentially ‘not relevant‘. Process is no substitute for paying attention.

Don’t get me wrong there’s nothing inherently wrong with a small dollop of process, just that it’s place is not centre stage in an international standard that purports to be about risk, not if you’re looking for an effective outcome. In real life it’s the unexpected, those black swans of Nassim Taleb’s flying in the dark skies of ignorance, that have the most effect, and about which ISO 31000 has nothing to say.

Postscript

Also the application of ISO 31000’s classical risk management to the workplace health and safety may actually be illegal in some jurisdictions (like Australia) where legislation is based on a backwards looking principle of due diligence, rather than a prospective risk based approach to workplace health and safety.