Archives For seat belt laws

As I was asked a question on risk homeostasis at the course I’m teaching, here without further ado is John Adam’s tour de force on The failure of seat belt legislation. Collectively, the group of countries that had not passed seat belt laws experienced a greater decrease than the group that had passed laws. Now John doesn’t directly draw the conclusion, but I will, that the seat belt laws kill more people than they save.

And it gets worse, in 1989 the British Government made seat belt wearing compulsory for children under 14 years old in the rear seats of cars, the result? In the year after there was an increase of almost 10% in the numbers of children killed in rear seats, and of almost 12% in the numbers injured (both above background increases). If not enacted there would be young adults now walking around today enjoying their lives, but of course the legislation was passed and we have to live with the consequences.

Now I could forgive the well intentioned who passed these laws, if when it became apparent that they were having a completely contrary effect they repealed them. But what I can’t forgive is the blind persistence, in practices that clearly kill more than they save. What can we make of this depraved indifference, other than people and organisations will sacrifice almost anything and anyone rather than admit they’re wrong?