Archives For SFAIRP

Here’s a short presentation  I gave on the ramifications of the Australian model WHS Act (2011) for engineers when they engage in, or oversee design. The act is a complex beast, and the ramifications of it have not yet fully sunk into the engineering community.

One particularly contentious area is the application of the act to plant and materials that are imported. While the guidance material for the act gives the example of a supplier performing additional testing of the goods to demonstrate it meets Australian Standards, the reality is well, a little different.

Work-Health-and-Safety

I’ll give you a hint it’s not pretty

Current Australian rail and workplace safety legislation requires that safety risks be either eliminated, or if that’s not possible be reduced, ‘so far as is reasonably practicable’. The intent is to ensure that all reasonable practicable precautions are in place, not to achieve some target level of risk.

There are two elements to what is ‘reasonably practicable’. A duty-holder must first consider what can be done – that is, what is possible in the circumstances for ensuring health and safety. They must then consider whether it is reasonable, in the circumstances to do all that is possible. This means that what can be done should be done unless it is reasonable in the circumstances for the duty-holder to do something less.

Worksafe  Australia

This is a real and intractable problem for standards that determine the degree of effort applied to treat a hazard using an initial assessment of risk (1). Nor can the legislation be put aside through appeals to such formalisms as the ALARP principle, or the invocation of a standard such as AS 61508 (2). In essence if you can do something, regardless of the degree of risk, then something should be done.  Continue Reading…

Enshrined in Australia’s current workplace health and safety legislation is the principle of ‘So Far As Is Reasonably Practicable’. In essence SFAIRP requires you to eliminate or to reduce risk to a negligible level as is (surprise) reasonably practicable. While there’s been a lot of commentary on the increased requirements for diligence (read industry moaning and groaning) there’s been little or no consideration of what is the ‘theory of risk’ that backs this legislative principle and how it shapes the current legislation, let alone whether for good or ill. So I thought I’d take a stab at it. 🙂 Continue Reading…

Taboo transactions and the safety dilemma Again my thanks goes to Ross Anderson over on the Light Blue Touchpaper blog for the reference, this time to a paper by Alan Fiske  an anthropologist and Philip Tetlock a social psychologist, on what they terms taboo transactions. What they point out is that there are domains of sharing in society which each work on different rules; communal, versus reciprocal obligations for example, or authority versus market. And within each domain we socially ‘transact’ trade-offs between equivalent social goods.

Continue Reading…