Archives For Small world theory

An interesting article in Forbes on human error in a very unforgiving environment, i.e. treating ebola patients, and an excellent use of basic statistics to prove that cumulative risk tends to do just that, accumulate. As the number of patients being treated in the west is pretty low at the moment it also gives a good indication of just how infectious Ebola is. One might also infer that the western medical establishment is not quite so smart as it thought it was, at least when it comes to treating the big E safely.

Of course the moment of international zen in the whole story had to be the comment by the head of the CDC Dr Friedan, that and I quote “clearly there was a breach in protocol”, a perfect example of affirming the consequent. As James Reason pointed out years ago there are two ways of dealing with human error, so I guess we know where the head of the CDC stands on that question. 🙂

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In case anyone missed it the Ebola outbreak in Africa is now into the ‘explosive’ phase of the classic logistics growth curve, see this article from New Scientist for more details. For small world perspective on pandemics see my earlier post on the H1N1 outbreak.

Here in the west we get all the rhetoric about Islamic State as an existential threat but little to nothing about the big E, even though this epidemic will undoubtedly kill more people than that bunch of crazies ever will. Ebola doesn’t hate us for who we are, but it’ll damn well kill a lot of people regardless.

Another worrying thought is that the more cases, the more generations of the disease clock over and the more chance there is for a much worse variant to emerge that’s got global legs. We’ve been gruesomely lucky to date that Ebola is so nasty, because it tends too burn out before going to far, but that can change ver quickly. This is a small world, and what happens inside a village in West Africa actually matters to people in London, Paris, Sydney or Moscow. Were I PM that’s where I’d be sending assistance not the cauldron of the Middle East…

One of the interesting features about real world epidemics (and pandemics) is that they don’t follow a nice smooth logistics curve (the classic s shape) of a period of slow growth followed by an explosive growth phase then eventually plateauing out in the final burnout phase.

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Small worlds and pandemics. Thinking about pandemics using network theory.

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